Sabbath Bible Lessons

Justification by Faith

<<  Previous  Next  >>
Lesson 5 Sabbath, November 4, 2017

Justification by Faith

“Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.” (Romans 5:1).

“The light given me of God places this important subject above any question in my mind. Justification is wholly of grace and not procured by any works that fallen man can do.”—Faith and Works, p. 20.

Suggested Reading:   Selected Messages, vol1, pp. 389–398.

Sunday October 29

1. THE CONDITIONS OF JUSTIFICATION

a. On what condition only can the sinner be justified? Acts 16:31; Galatians 3:11.

“When God pardons the sinner, remits the punishment he deserves, and treats him as though he had not sinned, He receives him into divine favor, and justifies him through the merits of Christ’s righteousness. The sinner can be justified only through faith in the atonement made through God’s dear Son, who became a sacrifice for the sins of the guilty world. No one can be justified by any works of his own. He can be delivered from the guilt of sin, from the condemnation of the law, from the penalty of transgression, only by virtue of the suffering, death, and resurrection of Christ.”—Selected Messages, bk1, p. 389.

b. Faith is the condition upon which God forgives and justifies the sinner. How does it operate? Matthew 15:22–28; Mark 9:20–24.

“Faith is the condition upon which God has seen fit to promise pardon to sinners; not that there is any virtue in faith whereby salvation is merited, but because faith can lay hold of the merits of Christ, the remedy provided for sin. Faith can present Christ’s perfect obedience instead of the sinner’s transgression and defection.”—Ibid., pp. 366, 367.


Monday October 30

2. AN EXAMPLE OF JUSTIFICATION—ABRAHAM

a. How was righteousness imputed to Abraham? What merit do works have in procuring justification? Genesis 15:1, 5, 6.

“Let the subject be made distinct and plain that it is not possible to effect anything in our standing before God or in the gift of God to us through creature merit. Should faith and works purchase the gift of salvation for anyone, then the Creator is under obligation to the creature. Here is an opportunity for falsehood to be accepted as truth. If any man can merit salvation by anything he may do, then he is in the same position as the Catholic to do penance for his sins. Salvation, then, is partly of debt, that may be earned as wages. If man cannot, by any of his good works, merit salvation, then it must be wholly of grace, received by man as a sinner because he receives and believes in Jesus. It is wholly a free gift. Justification by faith is placed beyond controversy. And all this controversy is ended, as soon as the matter is settled that the merits of fallen man in his good works can never procure eternal life for him. The light given me of God places this important subject above any question in my mind. Justification is wholly of grace and not procured by any works that fallen man can do.”—Faith and Works, pp. 19, 20.

b. Based on the experience of Abraham, how is righteousness imputed to the sinner? Romans 4:1–8.

“Righteousness is obedience to the law. The law demands righteousness, and this the sinner owes to the law; but he is incapable of rendering it. The only way in which he can attain to righteousness is through faith. By faith he can bring to God the merits of Christ, and the Lord places the obedience of His Son to the sinner’s account. Christ’s righteousness is accepted in place of man’s failure, and God receives, pardons, justifies, the repentant, believing soul, treats him as though he were righteous, and loves him as He loves His Son. This is how faith is accounted righteousness; and the pardoned soul goes on from grace to grace, from light to a greater light. He can say with rejoicing, ‘Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost; which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour; that being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life’ (Titus 3:5–7).”— Selected Messages, bk 1, p. 367.


Tuesday October 31

3. THE WOMAN WITH THE ISSUE OF BLOOD

a. What happened on the way when the Lord was going to Jairus’ home? Mark 5:22–27.

“As [the Great Physician] was passing, [a poor woman diseased with an issue of blood] reached forward, and succeeded in barely touching the border of His garment. But in that moment she knew that she was healed. In that one touch was concentrated the faith of her life, and instantly her pain and feebleness gave place to the vigor of perfect health. . . .

“The Saviour could distinguish the touch of faith from the casual contact of the careless throng. Such trust should not be passed without comment. He would speak to the humble woman words of comfort that would be to her a wellspring of joy, -words that would be a blessing to His followers to the close of time.”—The Desire of Ages, pp. 343, 344.

“He gave no opportunity for superstition to claim healing virtue for the mere act of touching His garments. It was not through the outward contact with Him, but through the faith which took hold on His divine power, that the cure was wrought.” —Ibid., p. 347.

b. What made the difference between the casual touches of the common people within the multitude and the touch of the sick woman on His garment? Mark 5:28–34.

“The wondering crowd that pressed close about Jesus realized no accession of vital power from the contact. But when the poor, suffering woman, who for twelve years had been an invalid, in her great need put forth her hand and touched the hem of His garment, she felt the healing virtue. Hers was the touch of faith, and Christ recognized that touch. He knew that virtue had gone out from Him. . . . The faith which avails to bring us in vital contact with Christ expresses on our part supreme preference, perfect reliance, entire consecration. This faith works by love and purifies the soul. It works in the life of the follower of Christ true obedience to God’s commandments; for love to God and love to man will be the result of vital connection with Christ.”—Selected Messages, bk 1, p. 334.


Wednesday November 1

THE HEALING OF A CHRONIC PARALYTIC

a. What kind of response did the paralytic make to the command of the Lord? What can we learn from his example? John 5:1–9.

“From the simple Bible account of how Jesus healed the sick, we may learn something about how to believe in Him for the forgiveness of sins. Let us turn to the story of the paralytic at Bethesda. The poor sufferer was helpless; he had not used his limbs for thirty-eight years. Yet Jesus bade him, ‘Rise, take up thy bed, and walk.’ The sick man might have said, ‘Lord, if Thou wilt make me whole, I will obey Thy word.’ But, no, he believed Christ’s word, believed that he was made whole, and he made the effort at once; he willed to walk, and he did walk. He acted on the word of Christ, and God gave the power. He was made whole.”—Steps to Christ, p. 50.

b. What example of the man restored to health should be followed by us? Mark 11:24.

“In like manner you are a sinner. You cannot atone for your past sins; you cannot change your heart and make yourself holy. But God promises to do all this for you through Christ. You believe that promise. You confess your sins and give yourself to God. You will to serve Him. Just as surely as you do this, God will fulfill His word to you. If you believe the promise-believe that you are forgiven and cleansed-God supplies the fact; you are made whole, just as Christ gave the paralytic power to walk when the man believed that he was healed. It is so if you believe it.

“Do not wait to feel that you are made whole, but say, ‘I believe it; it is so, not because I feel it, but because God has promised.’. . .

“There is a condition to this promise—that we pray according to the will of God. But it is the will of God to cleanse us from sin, to make us His children, and to enable us to live a holy life. So we may ask for these blessings, and believe that we receive them, and thank God that we have received them. It is our privilege to go to Jesus and be cleansed, and to stand before the law without shame or remorse. ‘There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.’ Romans 8:1.”—Ibid., p. 51.


Thursday November 2

3. EXERCISING FAITH

a. In order to receive faith where must we look? For what purpose is it given? Hebrews 12:2; John 6:29.

“While the sinner cannot save himself, he still has something to do to secure salvation. ‘Him that cometh to Me,’ says Christ, ‘I will in no wise cast out.’ John 6:37. But we must come to Him; and when we repent of our sins, we must believe that He accepts and pardons us. Faith is the gift of God, but the power to exercise it is ours. Faith is the hand by which the soul takes hold upon the divine offers of grace and mercy.”—Patriarchs and Prophets, p. 431.

b. How does Paul explain faith? What further explanation is given by the Spirit of Prophecy? Hebrews 11:1–3.

“Faith is not the ground of our salvation, but it is the great blessing—the eye that sees, the ear that hears, the feet that run, the hand that grasps. It is the means, not the end. If Christ gave His life to save sinners, why shall I not take that blessing? My faith grasps it, and thus my faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things unseen. Thus resting and believing, I have peace with God through the Lord Jesus Christ.”—SDA Bible Commentary [E. G. White Comments], vol. 6, p. 1073.


Friday November 3

PERSONAL REVIEW QUESTIONS

1. What is necessary to be justified?

2. How may it be shown that justification is not obtained by works?

3. What lesson may we learn from the experience of the woman among the people crowding around Jesus?

4. What enabled the sick man to receive the blessing and will also enable us to receive blessings?

5. How may we receive and benefit from faith?

<<  Previous  Next  >>